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Google App Engine for Business 101 #s2gx

How to Build, Manage & Run Your Business Applications on Google's Infrastructure
Christian Schalk - Developer Advocate, Google
  • not really an advocacy position
  • still in engineering, but work a lot more with users directly
  • go out to companies to help them be successful

What is cloud computing?
  • lots of different definitions
  • pyramid of (bottom up): 
    • infrastructure as a service 
      • joyent, rackspace, vmware, amazon web services
      • provides cooling, power, networking
    • application platform as a service 
      • GAE falls in this category
      • tools to build apps
    • software as a service 
      • google docs, etc.
GAE
  • easy to build
  • easy to maintain
  • easy to scale 
    • appengine resides in google's overall infrastructure so will scale up as needed
  • started with only python
  • with java support, opened the doors for java enterprise developers
By the Numbers
  • launched in 2008
  • 250,000 developers
  • 100,000+ apps
  • 500M+ daily pageviews 
    • 19,000 queries per second -- has almost doubled since January
Some Partners
  • best buy
  • socialwok
  • xylabs
  • ebay
  • android developer challenge
  • forbes
  • buddypoke 
    • 62 million users
  • gigya 
    • do social integration for large media events (movie launches, sports events) -- huge spikes in traffic so GAE just handles it
  • ubisoft
  • google lab
  • ilike
  • walk score
  • gigapan
  • others
  • point here is it's very easy to drop specific apps on GAE without running litearlly everything on GAE
  • very popular among social networking apps because of easy scalability
Why App Engine?
  • managing everything is hard
  • diy hosting means hidden costs 
    • idle capacity
    • software patches & upgrades
    • license fees
  • "cloud development in a box"
App Engine Details
  • collection of services 
    • memcache, datastore, url fetch, mail, xmpp, task queue, images, blobstore, user service
  • ensuring portability -- follows java standards 
    • servlets -> webapp container
    • jdo/jpa -> datasource api
    • java.net.URL -> URL fetch
    • javax.mail -> Mail API
    • javax.cache -> memcache
  • extended language support through jvm 
    • java, scala, jruby, groovy, quercus (php), javascript (rhino)
  • always free to get started
  • liberal quotas for free applications 
    • 5M pageviews/month
    • 6.5 CPU hours/day
Application Platform Management
  • download and install SDK 
    • Eclipse plugin also available
  • build app and then deploy to the public GAE servers
  • app engine dashboard
  • app engine health history 
    • shows status of each service individually across GAE as a whole
Tools
  • google app engine launcher for python
  • sdk console 
    • local version of the app engine dashboard
  • google plugin for eclipse 
    • wizard for building new app engine apps
    • can run the entire gae environment locally within eclipse
    • easy deployment to app engine servers
    • in process of building a new version of this with more features
Continuously Evolving
  • aggressive schedule for providing new features
  • may 2010 -- app engine for business announced
What's New?
  • multi-tenant apps with namespace API
  • high performance image serving
  • openid/oauth integration
  • custom error pages
  • increased quotas
  • app.yaml now usable in java apps
  • can pause task queues
  • dashboard graphs now show 30 days
  • more -- see http://googleappengine.blogpost.com
Getting Started
Creating and Deploying an App
  • demoing eclipse plugin
  • can create a new Google Web Application, optionally with GWT
  • projects follow the typical java webapp structure
  • before deployment, can test/debug locally just like any Java project in eclipse
  • even the datastore is available locally for development/testing
  • new features tend to be introduced in python first, then java gets them later
  • to deploy, right click the project, choose "google," then deploy 
    • this brings up a window where you put in your application ID and version, then uploads to the GAE servers
  • can log into GAE dashboard and configure billing with maximum charges if your app will exceed the free quotas
  • can use your own custom domains, this ties into google apps
  • can assign additional developers to GAE applications by email address
  • can deploy new versions of applications and keep the old ones as well, can toggle between versions and choose one as default
What about business applications?
  • GAE for Business
  • same scalable cloud hosting platform, but designed for the enterprise
  • not production quite yet
  • enterprise application management 
    • centralized domain console (preview available today)
  • enterprise reliability and support 
    • 99.9% SLA
    • direct support 
      • tickets tracked, phone support, etc.
  • hosted SQL (preview available today) 
    • managed relational sql database in the cloud
    • doesn't replace the datastore--available in addition to the datastore
  • ssl on your domain 
    • current core product doesn't offer this
  • secure by default 
    • integrated single signon
  • pricing that makes sense 
    • apps cost $8/user, up to a max of $1000 per month

Enterprise App Development With Google
  • GAE for Business
  • Google Apps for Business
  • Google Apps Marketplace
  • Firewall tunneling technology available (Secure Data Connector)
App Engine for Business Roadmap
  • enterprise admin console (preview)
  • direct support (preview)
  • hosted sql (limited release q4 2010)
  • sla (q4 2010)
  • enterprise billing (q4 2010)
  • custom domain ssl (2010 - 2011)
SQL Support
  • can run this all locally in eclipse
  • demo of spring mvc travel app running on GAE with the SQL database 
    • have to explicitly enable sessions
    • had to disable flow-managed persistence
Become an App Engine for Business Trusted Tester!

Comments

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